Exploring Early Maori Site

Northland bay confirmed as one of oldest human settlements in NZ

Radiocarbon dates, moa bones and extinct shellfish have confirmed a small cove in the Bay of Islands was home to some of the first humans to set foot in New Zealand.

Mangahawea Bay, on Moturua Island, was first excavated in 1981 by team of archaeologists from Auckland. Their finds included a hāngī pit, shells from a limpet which became extinct around the time people first arrived in New Zealand, and a pendant made from what appeared to be a tropical shell.

If that was the case, the pendant must have travelled across the Pacific with the ancestors of Māori.

For reasons which were unclear the dig was never written up and the finds ended up in boxes scattered around New Zealand.

Reanimating Tūpuna Stories

Tuia250 revives history through modern-day voyaging, storytelling, and now gaming.
Marlborough iwi, Te Atiawa, tells the story of the great navigator, Kupe who chased the cheeky octopus, Muturangi from his home in Hawaiki to Aotearoa after Muturangi stole fish from his net.

Healing Old Wounds

An important and startling new piece of Bay of Islands history was revealed at a Russell Museum Exhibition opening on Friday night. Henrik Grudemo, the Deputy Head Of Mission at the Swedish Embassy had come to Russell for the opening of Paradise Lost, an exhibition...

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